Bill to bar cryptocurrencies in Winter Session
   Date :24-Nov-2021

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NEW DELHI :
 
THE Government is likely to bring a bill in the ensuing Winter Session of Parliament to bar all but a few private cryptocurrencies and create a framework to regulate digital currency issued by the RBI. The Cryptocurrency and Regulation of Official Digital Currency Bill, 2021, is listed for introduction in the Lok Sabha in the Winter Session, scheduled to begin from November 29. This bill is among 26 bills listed for the session. These also include a bill to repeal the three farm laws, a proposal for which is to be discussed by the Union Cabinet on Wednesday. The bill seeks to “create a facilitative framework for the creation of the official digital currency to be issued by the Reserve Bank of India. It also seeks to prohibit all private cryptocurrencies in India, however, it allows for certain exceptions to promote the underlying technology of cryptocurrency and its uses”.
 
Currently, there is no regulation or any ban on the use of cryptocurrencies in the country. Against this backdrop, Prime Minister Narendra Modi, earlier this month, held a meeting on cryptocurrencies with senior officials, and indications are that strong regulatory steps could be taken to deal with the issue. Recently, there have been a rising number of advertisements, featuring even film stars, promising easy and high returns on investments in cryptocurrencies in recent times, amid concerns over such currencies being allegedly used for luring investors with misleading claims.
 
Last week, the Standing Committee on Finance, chaired by BJP member Jayant Sinha, met the representatives of crypto exchanges, blockchain and Crypto Assets Council (BACC), among others, and arrived at a conclusion that cryptocurrencies should not be banned, but it should be regulated. The Reserve Bank of India has repeatedly reiterated its strong views against cryptocurrencies, saying they pose serious threats to the macroeconomic and financial stability of the country and also doubted the number of investors trading on them and their claimed market value.